Cerrado species

Some of the Cerrado species included in the PNAS study are:

  • Kaempfer’s woodpecker (Celeus obrieni), a charismatic red-headed woodpecker. First recorded in 1926, Kaempfer’s woodpecker was believed extinct until 2006. Its population is estimated at fewer than 6000 (perhaps much fewer) individuals, and it is classified “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List.
  • The Blue-eyed ground-dove (Columbina cyanopis) was also rediscovered, as recently as 2015, after being thought extinct. Fewer than 250 individuals are believed to survive. It is classified “critically endangered” on the IUCN Red List.

Impacts of soy consumption by key markets on the Giant anteater in different Cerrado states

Chords show how soy expansion-related impacts on the Giant Anteater’s range in different states (on the lefthand side) are linked to soy products consumed in different markets (on the righthand side). Soy expansion is counted between 2000 and 2010; consumption patterns are for 2011. “Other states” are Bahia, Distrito Federal, Goiás, Maranhão, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Piauí, Paraná, Rondônia, São Paulo and Tocantins.

Source: Stockholm Environment Institute. Calculated from methods described in “Linking global drivers of agricultural trade to on-the-ground impacts on biodiversity”. Figure based on a Flourish visualization, interactive version and source data.

Shares of soy-related biodiversity impact in the Cerrado attributable to different consumer markets

Brazil, China and major world regions. Interactive version and source data on Flourish.

Source: Stockholm Environment Institute. Calculated from methods described in “Linking global drivers of agricultural trade to on-the-ground impacts on biodiversity”. Consumption figures include soy “embedded” in other consumed products. Size of circles represents impact per unit consumed.

 

Countries whose consumption accounts for 1-3% of the biodiversity impacts of soy grown within the Cerrado. Interactive version and source data on Flourish.

Source: Stockholm Environment Institute. Calculated from methods described in “Linking global drivers of agricultural trade to on-the-ground impacts on biodiversity”. Consumption figures include soy “embedded” in other consumed products. Size of circles represents impact per unit consumed.