The direct and indirect impacts of climate change have the potential to change international alliances, economic relations and create new security dilemmas.

Acting as a ‘threat-multiplier’, climate change exacerbates the risk of resource‑driven conflicts, the scale of damage to coastal cities and infrastructure, and the risk of political radicalisation.

China – due to its political and economic weight in international affairs, and its share of the global carbon emissions output – plays an indisputable role in future international security and prosperity, and the state of the global climate. There is a clear imperative from a security, foreign policy and climate perspective to better understand China’s climate security challenges, response drivers, and their potential impact on regional security.

Currently under development jointly between SEI, SIPRI, E3G, and Beijing University Climate Change Centre (U.S. partner being explored) with the aim to inform this process by bridging the gap between differing Chinese, European and American perceptions of climate security. It will also cover China’s evolving approach to climate security, and how climate concerns could shape China’s interests and behaviour in the coming decades.

The global strategic environment is facing major security challenges and transformation. Overlaid on this uncertain landscape are the potential impacts of rapidly advancing climate change. The direct and indirect impacts of climate change have the potential to change international alliances, economic relations and create new security dilemmas.

Acting as a ‘threat-multiplier’, climate change exacerbates the risk of resource‑driven conflicts, the scale of damage to coastal cities and infrastructure, and the risk of political radicalisation. China – due to its political and economic weight in international affairs, and its share of the global carbon emissions output – plays an indisputable role in future international security and prosperity, and the state of the global climate.

There is a clear imperative from a security, foreign policy and climate perspective to better understand China’s climate security challenges, response drivers, and their potential impact on regional security.

Currently under development jointly between SEI, SIPRI, E3G, and Beijing University Climate Change Centre (U.S. partner being explored) with the aim to inform this process by bridging the gap between differing Chinese, European and American perceptions of climate security.

It will also cover China’s evolving approach to climate security, and how climate concerns could shape China’s interests and behaviour in the coming decades.