This project is one of two projects, that jointly form a cooperative project “EU Climate Action Dialogues” and addresses two processes that are central to achieving climate neutrality: (1) Making climate policy a central issue of EU reform (Future of the EU); (2) the development and implementation of national long-term climate strategies (Climate Recon 2050).

In both instances, the project combines analysis with dialogue to inform political debate.

Climate Recon 2050 is supporting national long-term climate-planning frameworks and implementing national long-term climate strategies while contributing to the harmonisation of long-term climate action across the EU. The project supports a growing community of political and technical experts inside government institutions and provides opportunities for capacity building, exchange, and knowledge generation. It consists of three interlinked elements:

  1. Dialogue workshops for government experts, supported by targeted topical inputs
  2. Analysis of regional strategies for seminars informing and creating opportunities for cooperation between EU Member States and relevant stakeholders in target regions (SEE and CEE)
  3. Outreach activities incl. targeted events and online communication.

Long-term climate strategies are central to managing the transition to net zero emission economies and play a key role in informing near- and mid-term policies en route to 2050. All EU countries were expected to have completed a national LTCS by 2020, many for the first time. Notable disparities exist among existing strategies that points to significant differences in the capacity of Member States to implement such planning processes in an inclusive manner, and to the differences in their analytical and modelling capacity. This project supports strategy implementation and review in the target countries by helping them navigate the complex EU policy landscape and providing access to knowledge and opportunities to “learn from others”.

The project aims to create the following long-term impacts:

  • Robust and politically credible long-term climate planning FRAMEWORKS (that include strategies and other governance elements) in all EU MS that jointly allow the EU as a bloc to reach its 2050 climate neutrality target in a coherent, harmonized and efficient manner
  • Strengthened LONG-TERM ORIENTATION in near-term climate policy, specifically the next round of national energy and climate plans (NECPs), to avoid carbon lock-in effects
  • A lasting positive effect on CAPACITIES among CEE and SEE countries on long-term climate planning and governance.

The project consists of three interlinked elements:

  1. Dialogue workshops for government experts, supported by targeted topical inputs
  2. Analysis of regional strategies for seminars informing and creating opportunities for cooperation between EU MS and relevant stakeholders in target regions (Visegrad Group, Baltic States, Romania/Bulgaria, Slovenia/Croatia and Western Balkans)
  3. Outreach activities including targeted events and online communication.

Project partners

The project is divided into two distinct pillars, each with its own Dialogue element.

The Future of the EU – Making climate policy a central issue of EU reform

Climate Recon 2050 – a Dialogue on long-term strategies

The project is funded by European Climate Initiative (EUKI) .

Reaching climate neutrality in the Baltic States: A closer look at the long-term national strategies in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, 13th of September 2022, 10.30-16.00 EEST

To reach global climate stabilisation, it is crucial that countries develop long-term visions, goals and strategic guidelines for climate policy embedded in the broader sustainability agenda. All Member States are already legally obliged to produce, and periodically update, national long-term strategies in the European Union, as mandated by the Governance Regulation (2018/1999) of the European parliament and Council on 11th December 2018. However, countries have differed significantly in terms of their drafting process, final results, and timing. In the Baltic countries, strategies have been adopted between 2017 and 2021. During that time, the environment related to climate mitigation has continued to evolve, most recently with the Green Deal and ‘Fit for 55’ package of measures, and subsequently in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Although this complicates drawing direct comparisons, a clear distinction with some other member states (such as the Visegrad 4) can be seen in the degree of scenario modelling and the coverage of socioeconomic aspects included in the Baltic strategies. Moreover, limited attempts have so far been made to synthesise or integrate efforts across the region. On the other hand, a positive note is found in the requirement for strategies to be further updated, affording the opportunity to guide the process and seek best practices from all member states. The upcoming event will focus on an analysis of the approaches across the Baltic states to the development of each respective national long-term strategy and current best practices and highlight missing elements and cross-cutting issues.

The event organized by SEI Tallinn focused on an analysis of the approaches across the Baltic states to the development of each respective national long-term strategy and current best practices and highlight missing elements and cross cutting issues.

Below there are available three presentations from the event.

  1. Long-term strategies assessment of the Baltic State countries – best approaches and weaknesses (Peter Walke, SEI Tallinn)
  2. Assessing the long-term strategies of the Visegrád 4 – how do the Baltic states compare? (Krzysztof Kobyłka, Wise Europa)
  3. Balancing the equation: assessing the prospects of natural (LULUCF) and technological sinks (CCS/CCU/DAC…) from across the EU national long-term strategies (Peter Walke, SEI Tallinn)

Long-term strategies assessment of the Baltic State countries – best approaches and weaknesses (Peter Walke, SEI Tallinn)

Assessing the long-term strategies of the Visegrád 4 – how do the Baltic states compare? (Krzysztof Kobyłka, Wise Europa)

Balancing the equation: assessing the prospects of natural (LULUCF) and technological sinks (CCS/CCU/DAC…) from across the EU national long-term strategies (Peter Walke, SEI Tallinn)